Some Rules For Tourists In New York City This Summer


Some Rules For Tourists In New York City This Summer

Gawker has a few pet peeves they want to tell you about regarding the tourists that flock to New York City ever year (of course), and they have a few suggestions to help the visitors cohabitate better with the locals.

Gawker suggests that if you’re walking down the street, keep it to two people abreast, any more and you’re an obstruction. When navigating the subway escalators, remember that nothing pisses New Yorkers off more than standing on the left. Walkers are for the right, standers are for the left. Also, the two-by-two rule is reduced to one in these situations.

And what about reading maps while walking on a sidewalk? Don’t get them started!

That’s right, not a side-”stand there and look at a map” or a side-”slow down and look at the pretty buildings.” If you come to a full stop on the sidewalk, you’re going to interrupt the regular flow of traffic, which means people will run into you or be forced to go into the street to get around you. So just don’t stop. If you really must, do it someplace out of the way, like next to a lamppost or bus stop or some other structure that pedestrians are going to have to avoid anyway.



Published on May 21, 2010

  • Jean Weaver

    Think these could be rules for all city, citizens, & visitors alike, I have yet to be in any city in North America that couldn't use those rules (especially teeming with lots of people) Toronto, Canada is the worst place for people walking 5 abreast, stopping in the middle of busy streets to gawk, look at maps, talk to the the 5 abreast behind or in front etc. Is it the wide open spaces or what, because even Canadian small towns are the same. Do you think it's one of my biggest pet peeves, 2nd only to lying.

  • http://grantourismotravels.com/ lara dunston

    Not bad suggestions but I think those 'rules' should apply anywhere. Venice is teeming with tourists at the moment, all stopping to read maps in the most inconvenient places. People need to take time out more to stop in cafes, bars or parks and figure out a plan – and also be prepared to discard the map every once in a while.